Rate Limiting In Spring Cloud Gateway With Redis

Currently Spring Cloud Gateway is second the most popular Spring Cloud project just after Spring Cloud Netflix (in terms of number of stars on GitHub). It has been created as a successor of Zuul proxy in Spring Cloud family. This project provides an API Gateway for microservices architecture, and is built on top of reactive Netty and Project Reactor. It is designed to provide a simple, but effective way to route to APIs and address such popular concerns as security, monitoring/metrics, and resiliency. Continue reading “Rate Limiting In Spring Cloud Gateway With Redis”

Micronaut Tutorial: Reactive

This is the fourth part of my tutorial to Micronaut Framework – created after a longer period of time. In this article I’m going to show you some examples of reactive programming on the server and client side. By default, Micronaut support to reactive APIs and streams is built on top of RxJava. Continue reading “Micronaut Tutorial: Reactive”

Microservices with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Gateway and Consul Cluster

The Spring Cloud Consul project provides integration for Consul and Spring Boot applications through auto-configuration. By using the well-known Spring Framework annotation style, we may enable and configure common patterns within microservice-based environments. These patterns include service discovery using Consul agent, distributed configuration using Consul key/value store, distributed events with Spring Cloud Bus, and Consul Events. The project also supports a client-side load balancer based on Netflix’s Ribbon and an API gateway based on Spring Cloud Gateway. Continue reading “Microservices with Spring Boot, Spring Cloud Gateway and Consul Cluster”

Using Reactive WebClient with Spring WebFlux

Reactive APIs and generally reactive programming become increasingly popular lately. You have a change to observe more and more new frameworks and toolkits supporting reactive programming, or just dedicated for this. Today, in the era of microservices architecture, where the network communication through APIs becomes critical for applications, reactive APIs seems to be an attractive alternative to a traditional, synchronous approach. It should be definitely considered as a primary approach if you are working with large streams of data exchanged via network communication. Continue reading “Using Reactive WebClient with Spring WebFlux”

Performance Comparison Between Spring MVC and Spring WebFlux with Elasticsearch

Since Spring 5 and Spring Boot 2 there is a full support for reactive REST API with Spring WebFlux project. Also project Spring Data systematically includes support for reactive NoSQL databases, and recently for SQL databases too. Since Spring Data Moore we can take advantage of reactive template and repository for Elasticsearch, what I have already described in one of my previous article Reactive Elasticsearch With Spring Boot. Continue reading “Performance Comparison Between Spring MVC and Spring WebFlux with Elasticsearch”

Reactive Elasticsearch With Spring Boot

One of more notable feature introduced in the latest release of Spring Data is reactive support for Elasticsearch. Since Spring Data Moore we can take advantage of reactive template and repository. It is built on top of fully reactive Elasticsearch REST client, that is based on Spring WebClient. It is also worth to mention about support for reactive Querydsl, which can be included to your application through ReactiveQueryPredicateExecutor. Continue reading “Reactive Elasticsearch With Spring Boot”

Reactive Logging With Spring WebFlux and Logstash

I have already introduced my Spring Boot library for synchronous HTTP request/response logging in one of my previous articles Logging with Spring Boot and Elastic Stack. This library is dedicated for synchronous REST applications built with Spring MVC and Spring Web. Since version 5.0 Spring Framework also offers support for reactive REST API through Spring WebFlux project. I decided to extend support for logging in my library to reactive Spring WebFlux.

Continue reading “Reactive Logging With Spring WebFlux and Logstash”