Integration tests on OpenShift using Arquillian Cube and Istio

Building integration tests for applications deployed on Kubernetes/OpenShift platforms seems to be quite a big challenge. With Arquillian Cube, an Arquillian extension for managing Docker containers, it is not complicated. Kubernetes extension, being a part of Arquillian Cube, helps you write and run integration tests for your Kubernetes/Openshift application. It is responsible for creating and managing temporary namespace for your tests, applying all Kubernetes resources required to setup your environment and once everything is ready it will just run defined integration tests.
The one very good information related to Arquillian Cube is that it supports Istio framework. You can apply Istio resources before executing tests. One of the most important features of Istio is an ability to control of traffic behavior with rich routing rules, retries, delays, failovers, and fault injection. It allows you to test some unexpected situations during network communication between microservices like server errors or timeouts.
If you would like to run some tests using Istio resources on Minishift you should first install it on your platform. To do that you need to change some privileges for your OpenShift user. Let’s do that.

1. Enabling Istio on Minishift

Istio requires some high-level privileges to be able to run on OpenShift. To add those privileges to the current user we need to login as an user with cluster admin role. First, we should enable admin-user addon on Minishift by executing the following command.

$ minishift addons enable admin-user

After that you would be able to login as system:admin user, which has cluster-admin role. With this user you can also add cluster-admin role to other users, for example admin. Let’s do that.

$ oc login -u system:admin
$ oc adm policy add-cluster-role-to-user cluster-admin admin
$ oc login -u admin -p admin

Now, let’s create new project dedicated especially for Istio and then add some required privileges.

$ oc new-project istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-ingress-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z default -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z prometheus -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-egressgateway-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-citadel-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-ingressgateway-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-cleanup-old-ca-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-mixer-post-install-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-mixer-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-pilot-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-sidecar-injector-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user anyuid -z istio-galley-service-account -n istio-system
$ oc adm policy add-scc-to-user privileged -z default -n myproject

Finally, we may proceed to Istio components installation. I downloaded the current newest version of Istio – 1.0.1. Installation file is available under install/kubernetes directory. You just have to apply it to your Minishift instance by calling oc apply command.

$ oc apply -f install/kubernetes/istio-demo.yaml

2. Enabling Istio for Arquillian Cube

I have already described how to use Arquillian Cube to run tests with OpenShift in the article Testing microservices on OpenShift using Arquillian Cube. In comparison with the sample described in that article we need to include dependency responsible for enabling Istio features.

<dependency>
	<groupId>org.arquillian.cube</groupId>
	<artifactId>arquillian-cube-istio-kubernetes</artifactId>
	<version>1.17.1</version>
	<scope>test</scope>
</dependency>

Now, we can use @IstioResource annotation to apply Istio resources into OpenShift cluster or IstioAssistant bean to be able to use some additional methods for adding, removing resources programmatically or polling an availability of URLs.
Let’s take a look on the following JUnit test class using Arquillian Cube with Istio support. In addition to the standard test created for running on OpenShift instance I have added Istio resource file customer-to-account-route.yaml. Then I have invoked method await provided by IstioAssistant. First test test1CustomerRoute creates new customer, so it needs to wait until customer-route is deployed on OpenShift. The next test test2AccountRoute adds account for the newly created customer, so it needs to wait until account-route is deployed on OpenShift. Finally, the test test3GetCustomerWithAccounts is ran, which calls the method responsible for finding customer by id with list of accounts. In that case customer-service calls method endpoint by account-service. As you have probably find out the last line of that test method contains an assertion to empty list of accounts: Assert.assertTrue(c.getAccounts().isEmpty()). Why? We will simulate the timeout in communication between customer-service and account-service using Istio rules.

@Category(RequiresOpenshift.class)
@RequiresOpenshift
@Templates(templates = {
        @Template(url = "classpath:account-deployment.yaml"),
        @Template(url = "classpath:deployment.yaml")
})
@RunWith(ArquillianConditionalRunner.class)
@IstioResource("classpath:customer-to-account-route.yaml")
@FixMethodOrder(MethodSorters.NAME_ASCENDING)
public class IstioRuleTest {

    private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(IstioRuleTest.class);
    private static String id;

    @ArquillianResource
    private IstioAssistant istioAssistant;

    @RouteURL(value = "customer-route", path = "/customer")
    private URL customerUrl;
    @RouteURL(value = "account-route", path = "/account")
    private URL accountUrl;

    @Test
    public void test1CustomerRoute() {
        LOGGER.info("URL: {}", customerUrl);
        istioAssistant.await(customerUrl, r -> r.isSuccessful());
        LOGGER.info("URL ready. Proceeding to the test");
        OkHttpClient httpClient = new OkHttpClient();
        RequestBody body = RequestBody.create(MediaType.parse("application/json"), "{\"name\":\"John Smith\", \"age\":33}");
        Request request = new Request.Builder().url(customerUrl).post(body).build();
        try {
            Response response = httpClient.newCall(request).execute();
            ResponseBody b = response.body();
            String json = b.string();
            LOGGER.info("Test: response={}", json);
            Assert.assertNotNull(b);
            Assert.assertEquals(200, response.code());
            Customer c = Json.decodeValue(json, Customer.class);
            this.id = c.getId();
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Test
    public  void test2AccountRoute() {
        LOGGER.info("Route URL: {}", accountUrl);
        istioAssistant.await(accountUrl, r -> r.isSuccessful());
        LOGGER.info("URL ready. Proceeding to the test");
        OkHttpClient httpClient = new OkHttpClient();
        RequestBody body = RequestBody.create(MediaType.parse("application/json"), "{\"number\":\"01234567890\", \"balance\":10000, \"customerId\":\"" + this.id + "\"}");
        Request request = new Request.Builder().url(accountUrl).post(body).build();
        try {
            Response response = httpClient.newCall(request).execute();
            ResponseBody b = response.body();
            String json = b.string();
            LOGGER.info("Test: response={}", json);
            Assert.assertNotNull(b);
            Assert.assertEquals(200, response.code());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

    @Test
    public void test3GetCustomerWithAccounts() {
        String url = customerUrl + "/" + id;
        LOGGER.info("Calling URL: {}", customerUrl);
        OkHttpClient httpClient = new OkHttpClient();
        Request request = new Request.Builder().url(url).get().build();
        try {
            Response response = httpClient.newCall(request).execute();
            String json = response.body().string();
            LOGGER.info("Test: response={}", json);
            Assert.assertNotNull(response.body());
            Assert.assertEquals(200, response.code());
            Customer c = Json.decodeValue(json, Customer.class);
            Assert.assertTrue(c.getAccounts().isEmpty());
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}

3. Creating Istio rules

On of the interesting features provided by Istio is an availability of injecting faults to the route rules. we can specify one or more faults to inject while forwarding HTTP requests to the rule’s corresponding request destination. The faults can be either delays or aborts. We can define a percentage level of error using percent field for the both types of fault. In the following Istio resource I have defines 2 seconds delay for every single request sent to account-service.

apiVersion: networking.istio.io/v1alpha3
kind: VirtualService
metadata:
  name: account-service
spec:
  hosts:
    - account-service
  http:
  - fault:
      delay:
        fixedDelay: 2s
        percent: 100
    route:
    - destination:
        host: account-service
        subset: v1

Besides VirtualService we also need to define DestinationRule for account-service. It is really simple – we have just define version label of the target service.

apiVersion: networking.istio.io/v1alpha3
kind: DestinationRule
metadata:
  name: account-service
spec:
  host: account-service
  subsets:
  - name: v1
    labels:
      version: v1

Before running the test we should also modify OpenShift deployment templates of our sample applications. We need to inject some Istio resources into the pods definition using istioctl kube-inject command as shown below.

$ istioctl kube-inject -f deployment.yaml -o customer-deployment-istio.yaml
$ istioctl kube-inject -f account-deployment.yaml -o account-deployment-istio.yaml

Finally, we may rewrite generated files into OpenShift templates. Here’s the fragment of Openshift template containing DeploymentConfig definition for account-service.

kind: Template
apiVersion: v1
metadata:
  name: account-template
objects:
  - kind: DeploymentConfig
    apiVersion: v1
    metadata:
      name: account-service
      labels:
        app: account-service
        name: account-service
        version: v1
    spec:
      template:
        metadata:
          annotations:
            sidecar.istio.io/status: '{"version":"364ad47b562167c46c2d316a42629e370940f3c05a9b99ccfe04d9f2bf5af84d","initContainers":["istio-init"],"containers":["istio-proxy"],"volumes":["istio-envoy","istio-certs"],"imagePullSecrets":null}'
          name: account-service
          labels:
            app: account-service
            name: account-service
            version: v1
        spec:
          containers:
          - env:
            - name: DATABASE_NAME
              valueFrom:
                secretKeyRef:
                  key: database-name
                  name: mongodb
            - name: DATABASE_USER
              valueFrom:
                secretKeyRef:
                  key: database-user
                  name: mongodb
            - name: DATABASE_PASSWORD
              valueFrom:
                secretKeyRef:
                  key: database-password
                  name: mongodb
            image: piomin/account-vertx-service
            name: account-vertx-service
            ports:
            - containerPort: 8095
            resources: {}
          - args:
            - proxy
            - sidecar
            - --configPath
            - /etc/istio/proxy
            - --binaryPath
            - /usr/local/bin/envoy
            - --serviceCluster
            - account-service
            - --drainDuration
            - 45s
            - --parentShutdownDuration
            - 1m0s
            - --discoveryAddress
            - istio-pilot.istio-system:15007
            - --discoveryRefreshDelay
            - 1s
            - --zipkinAddress
            - zipkin.istio-system:9411
            - --connectTimeout
            - 10s
            - --statsdUdpAddress
            - istio-statsd-prom-bridge.istio-system:9125
            - --proxyAdminPort
            - "15000"
            - --controlPlaneAuthPolicy
            - NONE
            env:
            - name: POD_NAME
              valueFrom:
                fieldRef:
                  fieldPath: metadata.name
            - name: POD_NAMESPACE
              valueFrom:
                fieldRef:
                  fieldPath: metadata.namespace
            - name: INSTANCE_IP
              valueFrom:
                fieldRef:
                  fieldPath: status.podIP
            - name: ISTIO_META_POD_NAME
              valueFrom:
                fieldRef:
                  fieldPath: metadata.name
            - name: ISTIO_META_INTERCEPTION_MODE
              value: REDIRECT
            image: gcr.io/istio-release/proxyv2:1.0.1
            imagePullPolicy: IfNotPresent
            name: istio-proxy
            resources:
              requests:
                cpu: 10m
            securityContext:
              readOnlyRootFilesystem: true
              runAsUser: 1337
            volumeMounts:
            - mountPath: /etc/istio/proxy
              name: istio-envoy
            - mountPath: /etc/certs/
              name: istio-certs
              readOnly: true
          initContainers:
          - args:
            - -p
            - "15001"
            - -u
            - "1337"
            - -m
            - REDIRECT
            - -i
            - '*'
            - -x
            - ""
            - -b
            - 8095,
            - -d
            - ""
            image: gcr.io/istio-release/proxy_init:1.0.1
            imagePullPolicy: IfNotPresent
            name: istio-init
            resources: {}
            securityContext:
              capabilities:
                add:
                - NET_ADMIN
          volumes:
          - emptyDir:
              medium: Memory
            name: istio-envoy
          - name: istio-certs
            secret:
              optional: true
              secretName: istio.default

4. Building applications

The sample applications are implemented using Eclipse Vert.x framework. They use Mongo database for storing data. The connection settings are injected into pods using Kubernetes Secrets.

public class MongoVerticle extends AbstractVerticle {

	private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(MongoVerticle.class);

	@Override
	public void start() throws Exception {
		ConfigStoreOptions envStore = new ConfigStoreOptions()
				.setType("env")
				.setConfig(new JsonObject().put("keys", new JsonArray().add("DATABASE_USER").add("DATABASE_PASSWORD").add("DATABASE_NAME")));
		ConfigRetrieverOptions options = new ConfigRetrieverOptions().addStore(envStore);
		ConfigRetriever retriever = ConfigRetriever.create(vertx, options);
		retriever.getConfig(r -> {
			String user = r.result().getString("DATABASE_USER");
			String password = r.result().getString("DATABASE_PASSWORD");
			String db = r.result().getString("DATABASE_NAME");
			JsonObject config = new JsonObject();
			LOGGER.info("Connecting {} using {}/{}", db, user, password);
			config.put("connection_string", "mongodb://" + user + ":" + password + "@mongodb/" + db);
			final MongoClient client = MongoClient.createShared(vertx, config);
			final CustomerRepository service = new CustomerRepositoryImpl(client);
			ProxyHelper.registerService(CustomerRepository.class, vertx, service, "customer-service");	
		});
	}
}

MongoDB should be started on OpenShift before starting any applications, which connect to it. To achieve it we should insert Mongo deployment resource into Arquillian configuration file as env.config.resource.name field.
The configuration of Arquillian Cube is visible below. We will use an existing namespace myproject, which has already granted the required privileges (see Step 1). We also need to pass authentication token of user admin. You can collect it using command oc whoami -t after login to OpenShift cluster.

<extension qualifier="openshift">
	<property name="namespace.use.current">true</property>
	<property name="namespace.use.existing">myproject</property>
	<property name="kubernetes.master">https://192.168.99.100:8443</property>
	<property name="cube.auth.token">TYYccw6pfn7TXtH8bwhCyl2tppp5MBGq7UXenuZ0fZA</property>
	<property name="env.config.resource.name">mongo-deployment.yaml</property>
</extension>

The communication between customer-service and account-service is realized by Vert.x WebClient. We will set read timeout for the client to 1 second. Because Istio injects 2 seconds delay into the route, the communication is going to end with timeout.

public class AccountClient {

	private static final Logger LOGGER = LoggerFactory.getLogger(AccountClient.class);
	private Vertx vertx;

	public AccountClient(Vertx vertx) {
		this.vertx = vertx;
	}
	
	public AccountClient findCustomerAccounts(String customerId, Handler<AsyncResult<List>> resultHandler) {
		WebClient client = WebClient.create(vertx);
		client.get(8095, "account-service", "/account/customer/" + customerId).timeout(1000).send(res2 -> {
			if (res2.succeeded()) {
				LOGGER.info("Response: {}", res2.result().bodyAsString());
				List accounts = res2.result().bodyAsJsonArray().stream().map(it -> Json.decodeValue(it.toString(), Account.class)).collect(Collectors.toList());
				resultHandler.handle(Future.succeededFuture(accounts));
			} else {
				resultHandler.handle(Future.succeededFuture(new ArrayList()));
			}
		});
		return this;
	}
}

The full code of sample applications is available on GitHub in the repository https://github.com/piomin/sample-vertx-kubernetes/tree/openshift-istio-tests.

5. Running tests

You can the tests during Maven build or just using your IDE. As the first test1CustomerRoute test is executed. It adds new customer and save generated id for two next tests.

arquillian-istio-3

The next test is test2AccountRoute. It adds an account for the customer created during previous test.

arquillian-istio-2

Finally, the test responsible for verifying communication between microservices is running. It verifies if the list of accounts is empty, what is a result of timeout in communication with account-service.

arquillian-istio-1

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Author: Piotr Mińkowski

IT Architect, Java Software Developer

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